Update on ANCIL at LSE

I returned to work fired up after the AldinHE and Lilac conferences and got stuck into trying to create a simple questionnaire for LSE staff based on the ANCIL strands. It was aimed at staff who might not have time to meet up for am interview. However the questions don’t translate very well into survey format as one in particular looked like a hugely off putting long list.

So building on the handouts we created for the conferences, I have tried to describe each strand of the curriculum concisely to find out if teachers feel they cover aspects in their own teaching either formally or informally, if they refer students elsewhere and if it is embedded in their curriculum or as a standalone session.

This week I also had the opportunity to take this to a forum of departmental tutors responsible for undergraduate students in each academic department at LSE. The forum is chaired by our Dean of Undergraduate Studies who I also had a chance to interview. She seemed to recognise the value of a curriculum such as ANCIL while stressing it must be embedded in the discipline to be meaningful to students! She also suggested immediately that we should be more ambitious saying this went beyond skills and was linked to how education needs to change in light of new technologies. Some of what she said reminded me of Lord Puttnam’s keynote at LILAC about us needing a digital pedagogy not to digitise the old pedagogy.

So what next? More interviews with staff next week and some student focus groups I hope! We have also had questionnaire returned from most of the liaison librarians at LSE now, which is highlighting some interesting issues about the teaching and support they provide. I am now getting very excited and have also circulated the survey to our graduate teaching assistants at LSE! Watch this space.

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One Response to Update on ANCIL at LSE

  1. Pingback: Social Software, libraries & e-learning » Blog Archive » Adventures in information literacy

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